A World Music Magazine
                      

world music Anoura, the new album by Malian singer and guitarist Anansy Cissé, was produced over a period of four years against a background of political turmoil in the north of Mali where Cissé is from. The sleeve notes tell us that that some of the songs, all sung in his own Songhai language, reflect this particular social situation while others express more personal feelings. The four years have allowed time for the production to be well honed and with its thoughtful layering of interlocking guitar overdubs it certainly feels like a studio album, but it's none the worse for that and never sounds overworked. Throughout the album there is an extremely effective play-off between the acoustic and electric sounds coming from guitar, ngoni and, on two tracks, the soku, a Malian fiddle. Read Mike Adcock's review and listen to some excerpts from the new album

 

world music Orava - Panorama Of Folk Song And Music Culture comes as a very nicely put together package: two CDs, in a 74 page hard-back book in a protective sleeve containing lots of color photos and details of the performers, texts about the project, song lyrics, and a map of the region. It features music by performers from 19 villages in the Orava region, which is at Slovakia's northern tip, bordering on Poland. It features male and female singers solo and ensemble, in unison and harmony, unaccompanied or joined by diatonic accordions, fiddles, string bands, bagpipes, or whistles including píštalka and koncovka. It's strong, loud singing, characteristically often pushing to the very top of the singers' registers, as is much Slovak singing particularly in the mountainous areas, and the melodies are in the distinctive modes that are typical of much old Slovak tradition, returning frequently to the root note but nevertheless having a feeling of suspension. http://www.rootsworld.com/reviews/orava-21.shtml Join Andrew Cronshaw in exploring the music of this region.

 

world music Dust to Digital has released a number of other projects of 78-era global music focused collections... But Excavated Shellac bounces around the world from track to track, and with 100 performances, almost none of which has seen prior reissue, it allows for necessary depth. The 186-page PDF booklet contains an insightful introduction and detailed track-by-track notes by Jonathan Ward, whose music blog and personal collection is the basis of thisrelease. But it's the music that makes this such an important release. Read Bruce Miller's deep look inside a collection that he says will "challenge our notions of divisions either by geography or colonizer over colonized."

 

world music Alostmen, a quartet centered on two-stringed lute player Stevo Atimbire, are pushing music forward a bit differently; their approach is much more rooted in Ghana's past. For one, Atimbire's kologo is an instrument that connects to fra fra tribespeople in the country's north. And certain tracks, such as the unadorned "Bayiti," driven by voice and solo kologo, are unmistakably West African, the voices repeating singular words over the melodically minimal music. Yet, Alostmen are young guys as into hip hop or reggae as anything traditional, which is why their music sounds so startling fresh. Read Bruce Miller's review.

 

world music There is always a sense of satisfaction when two veterans from entirely different musical scenes join forces to create something genuinely new and different, the feeling that old dogs still have some new tricks left. Poul Lendal is certainly a respected old dog of Danish folk music; after more than four decades as a performer and teacher he's pretty much a godfather of it all. David Mondrup's time with electronic music isn't quite as long, but he's established a reputation as one of Denmark's great innovators and teachers of the subject. As Vaev, the pair have come up with something that steps outside the sometimes-jaded boundaries of folktronica. Chris Nickson shows us an interesting new kind of folk music from Denmark.

 

world music Ville Ojanen is from Finland's fiddling nexus, Kaustinen, and over the years has been a member of Sikiät, the dance group Ottoset, Folkkarit and Troka. While still a part of that scene, and the Kaustinen accent and its evolving tradition is strongly there in his compositions, he moved away geographically, the music he composes is wider in its influences, and while he's a very fine fiddler, his albums aren't about showcasing his fiddling, with other instruments in an accompanying role; they're albums of his compositions, featuring a variety of musicians. This is his fifth, with a titular tie-up he must have been waiting for: the Roman numeral V, 'viisi' - Finnish for five and his first initial. Listen while you read Andrew Cronshaw's review.

 

world music Influenced by the Latin-American nueva canción movement as well as the 1960s British invasion which they were exposed to growing up, Los Bunkers learned their musical chops as a Beatles cover band in the Biobio region, hence their original moniker Los "Biotles." With the return of democracy and a limited but vibrant music industry they moved to Santiago. It seemed that this young Chilean band incarnated not just the psychedelia of the British invasion, but also the emancipatory power of Chilean folksong. David Cox explores the history of this important Chilean band.

 

world music Despite having been formed nearly a decade ago, Floyds Row, named for a thoroughfare in their home base of Oxford, have but one album to their name. Recorded in 2013 and bearing a 2017 release date, The Oxford Sessions has a classical and early music air with some folk and traditional tinges. The core ensemble is the trio of Alistair Anderson (concertina, Northumbrian small pipes), Andrew Arceci (viola da gamba, double bass) and Chris Ferebee (guitar, mandolin, cittern, lyre). Vocalists Hannah James and Joshua Copeland, flautist Becky Rea and harmonium player James Percival are listed as guests. Split evenly between original compositions and arrangements of others' works, the tracks are more likely to make you lay back and ponder rather then get up and dance. Tom Orr shows that here at RootsWorld, it does not have to be new to be newsworthy.

 

world music

world music

In 2009, Omar Sosa made an eight-country tour of East Africa. The tour resulted in the film documentary "Souvenirs d'Afrique," and an evocative trove of Sosa's improvisations with local traditional artists during each of the tour stops. More than a decade later, and the consequence of close and sympathetic listening across half a continent, An East African Journey achieves what few so-called "world music" undertakings ever manage. Sosa's playing is restrained throughout, engaging with, augmenting, and building upon the subtle creations of his artistic partners, rather than using their striking and diverse talents as mere spice for his own work. What makes this title still more compelling is its departure from European and North American artists' more typical turn to West Africa for genre-bending musical inspiration.

Sosa collaborates with Olith Ratego (Kenya), Rajery and Monja Mahafay (Madagascar), Abel Ntalasha (Zambia), Steven Sogo (Burundi), Seleshe Damessae (Ethiopia), Dafaalla Elhag Ali (Sudan) and Menwar (Mauritius) on the 13 tracks presented on his new release. Michael Stone delves into this fascinating approach to collaboration. Read his review and listen to some of the music.

 

world music There has been some sniffiness among purveyors of… call it what you will, but 'world music'… about the 'fusion' word. Indeed its use can sometimes warn of music that, though often skillfully played, might turn out to have a rootless superficiality. So, on the face of it, Folklore Fusions is not a promising title. But, at least for the 'folklore' part, in today's stream of recorded music in all its formats perhaps there's some sense in giving the prospective listener some clue as to what sort of thing they will hear.

Shum Davar, based in Prague, is a band whose members have Belorussian, Georgian, Czech and Slovak backgrounds, playing music drawing mainly on klezmer, Roma and Balkan traditions. Fusion, folklore or whatever, they have excellent material, both traditional and new-made, and they do it with such fire and originality that one's immediately engaged in the album's well put together flow. Read Andrew Cronshaw's review and listen to some excerpts from the album.

 

world music Initially, François Couture's Souvenance fulfills the expectation that it is to be a collection of 14 dance tunes, originals but keeping well within the conventions of the tradition. Given that this is music from Quebec, it doesn't come as a surprise to find the track list includes gigues (a mainstay of the region's tradition), Celtic style jigs and reels, and melodies with a sometimes decidedly French flavor. In fact the titles of all the tracks here indicate that they are conceived as dance tunes. But as things develop things are not always quite what they seem. Mike Adcock takes you through the twists and turns of this danceable yet challenging set of tunes.

 

world music On Y, Motus Laevus delivers a seriously diverse blend of new thinking and traditional melodies, ranging from slow and relaxing tunes to fast arrangements that makes you want to dance. The musicians behind the project, Edmondo Romeno, (soprano sax,clarinets, and chalumeau and fluier - wooden flutes). Tina Omerzo (voice, piano, keyboards) and Luca Falomi ( acoustic, classical, baritone,12 strings and electric guitars, acoustic bass) all have impressive backgrounds in playing, composing and researching a variety of musical genres. Maria Ezzitouni reviews. The band shares two videos.

 

world music While drummer Terje Isungset and trumpet player Arve Henriksen (who both double on several other instruments here) have long musical histories apart and together, more apart, really; this is their first duo release in six years. The Art of Travel is an album that delves deep to find hidden corners and curious nooks and crannies, the way all good travellers should. The pair show that there is an art to their particular type of travel, crossing through chaos to find order and beauty in the music. It's a mix that travels through time and space, on files exchanged online between their homes in Norway and Sweden during lockdown. Chris Nickson takes you there to listen.

 

world music "I wanted to make a record, both of us did, that had a strong female voice, without any apology for that."

Sad, funny, poignant, quirky. The new album from Suzzy Roche and her daughter, Lucy Wainwright Roche, is indelibly colored by the surreal, frightening first weeks of the pandemic, which stopped New York City in its tracks, though this duo found a way to wriggle through and create a comforting and discomforting elegy for our times. Marty Lipp talked to Suzzy Roche about the new recording, life in lock down in NYC, her sisters, and of course, her daughter Lucy.

 

world music Bará is a trio based in Europe, but the music has roots that spread much wider. Vocalist and ngoni player Baba Sissoko hails from Mali and his original songs call on that country's rich traditions. Percussionist Afra Mussawisade was born in Iran where he studied Persian classical music but he moved to Europe as a child, soon becoming exposed to other musical styles. Jozef Dumoulin, on keyboards, is Belgian. He began his career studying jazz piano but his inspiration now comes from a much broader musical field. All three musicians have worked with a wide range of international musicians in concerts and recording and have played together before, but this is their first venture recording as a trio. The result is an album that sounds fresh, varied and rather special. Whilst each musician makes his own distinct contribution to Bolo Saba, there is a sense of unity and purpose in the music that belies the differences between them. Read Mike Adcock's review and listen to some of the songs.

 

world music Ásgeir Ásgeirsson is an Icelandic player of bouzouki, saz and more. Since 2017 he has been creating a big, beautifully executed project: a trilogy of albums of Icelandic folk songs and melodies from Bjarni Thorsteinsson's 1905 collection, interpreted and developed from the perspective of the traditions of Turkey, Bulgaria and Iran. Featuring top musicians from those places, with the songs largely performed by Icelandic singer Sigrídur Thorlacius, they were recorded in studios in Iceland, Bulgaria, Greece, Turkey, the Netherlands, Iran and India.

This year brings the final album, Icelandic Folksongs Volume 3, Persian Path. Its instrumentation comprises a rich orchestral blend of qanun, santur, oud, ney, kamanche, qeychak, setar, violin, cello, percussion and Ásgeirsson's instruments which here include touches of guitar synth. They mould themselves to the Icelandic material, elaborating and extending it with arrangement and composition by Ásgeirsson and the players. The result is a sweeping, indeed epic, flow of melodies. Read Andrew Cronshaw's review and listen to some of all three recordings in the series.

 

world music "Inside my mountain, hay un misterio."
With these suggestive words, the first line of the first track of Oye Mujer (Listen Up, Woman), Ladama lays down their brand of sexual politics vaunting empowerment and liberation on their own terms. Ladama (La Dama—the lady, without a facetious undertone) is an all women collective of players from the Latin American world, including the US. Ladama isn't intent to merely throw down a velvet gauntlet of sexual empowerment. The group has also taken up, notably as women, the web of urgencies of the day, including global warming, homelessness, poverty, immigration, indigenous rights, and more. Ladama is not just a mouthpiece against indignity: these women are serious musicians, all, and care equally about their art as players, composers, lyricists and arrangers, achieved, they are proud to disclose, collectively. Their commitment to mastery as women musicians engages the listener, lending more agency to their message. Read Carolina Amoruso's review and listen.

 

world music Makgona Tsohle Reggi is a collection of ska and jerk-inspired instrumentals by the Makgona Tsohle Band. But this is decidedly not a reggae or ska record. What it is instead is a collection of twelve sharp, terse performances featuring organ-drenched staccato chug, guitars that seem to push past the limits of their amplifiers, and saxophones-as-human-voice, all buoyed by drum patterns that skitter and jab. And while the influence of Jamaica is present, it melds so effortlessly with South Africa's own sounds of the era as to have ended up producing a type of raw, garage groove that occasionally defies geographical identity altogether. Listen to the music and read Bruce Miller's review.

 

world music It's been a lousy year, but one would never know it listening to Sharon Shannon's joyous new album The Reckoning, which was conceived, made remotely and released through the early months of the coronavirus pandemic. We've been told that during this dark, turbulent and grueling year to find our little joys. And damned if Shannon hasn't done just that, finding joy in her squeezebox, tootling out tunes with a band of co-conspirators from around the world, managing a virtual worldwide trip while staying locked down in her County Galway home. Read Marty Lipp's review.

 

world music The story on how Rafael Machuca, a Colombia tax lawyer, came to own and operate Colombia's most eccentric record label is almost as odd as the sounds found in this collection. The tale goes something like this: Machuca was in charge of finding live music for a lawyers directors' party, and, having no clue how to search for traditional sounds, contacted his brother-in-law, Humberto Castillo, a record dealer in Medellin. Castillo traveled up country and helped Machuca find a variety of Barranquilla nightspots full of local talent that no one had thought to record. The long and short of all this is that Machuca, a man who previously had no interest in music, much less the music business, became infatuated with what he heard, joined one band on tour and ultimately used his tax knowledge to form a label with contacts and suggestions for musicians by Castillo. Out of this came a half decade of coastal Colombia's most outrageous psychedelic rhythms. Machuca encouraged single-takes, and at times, put together bands out of whoever was around, meaning some of these "groups" he recorded never existed outside of the one or two sides they waxed for the label. The music on La Lorcura de Machuca 1975-1980 is well-grounded in Cumbia and Vallenato, so its roots aren't obscured so much as decked out in glow-in-the-dark feathers and high-heels. Read Bruce Miller's review and listen to a few tracks.

 

world music Cimarrón is a Colombian group playing llanero joropo music, the music of Colombia's north-eastern plains (los llanos). In October, they performed live from the river and savannahs in the Orinoco Plains. Watch the impressive full video (24 minutes) and read a short intro to their music by Andrew Cronshaw.

 

world music The term "Afro-Futurism," supposedly coined in 1993, but certainly put into practice philosophically and otherwise way before then, has been receiving much attention over the last few years. And it makes sense too. When a group of people- jailed, shot by police, denied fair housing, wages, or equity with regards to all manners of health and educational issues- finds itself systemically deprived of justice, a look to sci-fi and other ways to use the future as a way to escape the present is one logical reaction to various forms of oppression. The idea of space travel, both figurative and literal, is what fueled the music and writings of master bandleader, composer, and keyboard wizard Sun Ra... It only makes sense that Canadian-Malian artist Djely Tapa would embrace the term as a way to update griot traditions as a form of feminism. She has harnessed rhythms and stories at their root, but delivered them coated in dub murk and trippy electronics. Tapa grew up in Kayes, learning the music of the griots to whom she was related, all the while finding herself fascinated with Western culture. Eventually moving to Montreal to study Mechanical Engineering, she fell in with the cities massive African Diaspora and dug back into her griot-based roots. Eventually, she connected with Chadian-Canadian DJ AfrotroniX, who produced Barokan. Read Bruce Miller's review and listen to some of the music.

 

Read more reviews from
2021
2020
2019
2018
2017
2016

 

We Interupt Our Regularly Scheduled Magazine For This Important Announcement.

RootsWorld cannot survive without the support of our readers. If you want to hear great music and read great writers, then we need each listener and reader to contribute just a little to make it happen. Please join us!

Make a One Time Contribution Today!

$5.00
$10.00
$20.00
$40.00
$70.00
$100.00

 


Please contribute to our survival.

About RootsWorld: RootsWorld is a world music magazine started in 1993, pretty much at the dawn of the term "world music" as well as the pre-dawn of internet publishing (I suspect this was the first music magazine of any sort published on the www). Our focus is the music of the world: Africa, Asia, Europe, Pacifica and The Americas, the roots of the global musical milieu that has come to be known as world music, be it traditional folk music, jazz, rock or some hybrid. How is that defined? I don't know and don't particularly care at this point: it's music from someplace you aren't, music with roots, music of the world and for the world. OK?

All pages at RootsWorld are © 1992-2020 RootsWorld/ Cliff Furnald / FNI Multimedia Publishing, New Haven CT
The RootsWorld name is protected by US trademark law.
All picture and sound images are the property of the artists and record labels, and are protected by copyright. No file or part of a file may be used for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, without the express written consent of RootsWorld or the other copyright owners.
About the use of sound files and copyright protections at RootsWorld